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when do i need to replace the discs from my discbrakes on a bicycle

The frequency of replacing the discs on your bicycle's disc brakes depends on several factors, including how often you ride, the terrain you ride on, your braking habits, and the condition of your discs.

As a general rule of thumb, you should replace your disc brake rotors when they become too thin or have become warped beyond the manufacturer's tolerance. Most disc rotors have a minimum thickness stamped on them, and when they wear down to that point, it's time to replace them.

However, it's also worth noting that disc rotors can last a long time, and they may only need to be replaced once every few years, depending on your usage. If you notice a decrease in braking power or a grinding noise when you apply your brakes, it could be a sign that your rotors need to be replaced.

It's always a good idea to have a professional mechanic inspect your bike's brakes regularly to ensure they are in good condition and replace any worn or damaged components as needed.

 

 

how are discs from discbrakes connected to the wheel of my bicycle

The disc rotors on your bicycle's disc brakes are connected to the wheel hub using a method known as a "center lock" or a "6-bolt" system.

In a center lock system, the rotor is attached to the hub using a lockring that threads onto the hub. The rotor then slides onto the splines of the lockring and is held in place by it. This system is used by Shimano and some other manufacturers.

In a 6-bolt system, the rotor is attached to the hub using six bolts that are threaded into the hub. The rotor has six holes that line up with the bolt holes on the hub. The bolts are threaded through the rotor and into the hub to hold the rotor in place. This system is used by many other manufacturers, including SRAM and Avid.

In both systems, the rotor is located between the brake pads and is squeezed by them when the brake lever is pulled. This causes friction, which slows down the wheel and brings the bicycle to a stop.

 

 


what size disc brake rotors are there for bicycles

Disc brake rotors for bicycles come in a variety of sizes, but the most common sizes are 140mm, 160mm, 180mm, and 203mm in diameter.

The size of the rotor you need depends on several factors, including the type of riding you do, your weight, and your braking style. Generally, larger rotors provide more stopping power and better heat dissipation, which is particularly useful for downhill riding or heavy riders.

Here is a breakdown of some common sizes and their typical applications:

140mm: This size is typically used on road bikes, cyclocross bikes, and lightweight cross-country mountain bikes.

160mm: This is the most common size and is suitable for most riders and riding styles, including trail riding and cross-country mountain biking.

180mm: This size provides more stopping power and is ideal for riders who are heavier or who ride more technical terrain, such as downhill or enduro mountain biking.

203mm: This size is the largest and provides the most stopping power. It is typically used on downhill mountain bikes or e-bikes.

It's essential to choose the appropriate size rotor for your bike and riding style to ensure optimal braking performance and safety.

 


which brands make disc rotors for bicycles

There are several manufacturers that make disc brake rotors for bicycles, including:

Shimano: Shimano is a well-known manufacturer of bike components and produces a range of disc brake rotors, including its popular SM-RT86 and SM-RT66 models.

SRAM: SRAM is another leading manufacturer of bike components and produces a range of rotors, including its popular Centerline and G2 models.

Avid: Avid is a subsidiary of SRAM and produces a range of rotors, including its popular CleanSweep and HS1 models.

Hope: Hope is a British manufacturer of bike components and produces a range of rotors, including its popular floating rotor and standard rotor models.

Magura: Magura is a German manufacturer of bike components and produces a range of rotors, including its popular Storm and MDR models.

TRP: TRP is a Taiwanese manufacturer of bike components and produces a range of rotors, including its popular TRP-25 and TRP-33 models.

These are just a few examples of the many manufacturers that produce disc brake rotors for bicycles. When choosing a rotor, it's essential to consider factors such as the rotor size, weight, and intended use to ensure optimal braking performance and compatibility with your bike's brake system.

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